Engine swap part 2 – sr16ve, sorting out the mechanicals

Well with the new sr16ve mounted to the car properly it was time to turn to hooking it up mechanically, the drive shafts were the first thing on the list so that’s where we began, luckily the hubs on the n15 and n16 petrol motors share the same spline pattern so the outer cv’s fit perfectly between them so there were no problems there, so i used a stock n15 vz-r passenger side drive shaft, the passenger side drive shaft needs to be from an n15 that uses the rs5f32v gearbox being as it has a vlsd it has a shorter shaft than that used in the non vlsd gearbox. for the drivers side shaft i used one from an n15 almera gti, though this needs some modification to the shaft at the inner end, this is again due to the fact that the rs5f32v uses the vlsd differential. all that needs done is the removal of about 6-8mm from the end of the splined part of the shaft, somewhere about the yellow line in this pic, otherwise the drive shaft doesn’t go far enough into place to allow the half shaft mounting bracket to line up properly.

inner spline cut point

also here’s the jdm n15 vz-r passenger side short drive shaft and the ukdm n15 gti drivers side long drive shaft side by side

n15 vz-r and n15 gti drive shafts

with the drive shafts sorted it was time for the gear linkage, being as the qg15 uses the rs5f30a gearbox the gear linkage isn’t compatible without modification, this is because it is too short, and also the part where it bolts to the gearbox shifter rod is canted on an angle where as the rs5f32v requires a straight one. there are 2 options for this, one is to cut lengthen and re-align the mating part of the existing linkage, or do what i did and source a gear linkage from a ph1 n16 diesel that has the rs5f50a gearbox as that has the correct angled mating piece and is almost the perfect length, all that required modifying was the holes on the rear mounting bracket needed elongated by 5mm and also 5mm cut off the front edges to have everything sitting perfectly

the 30a series shifter on top, and the 50a series shifter on the bottom, you can clearly see the angled mating piece on the 30a shifter

30a and 50a series gear linkage

and the rear bracket (gear stick end) modifications required, modified on the left stock on the right

modified gear linkage rear mount

i also fitted a new manifold, an ebay special, it’s made by toyosport and is the usual hotshot replica that is sold all over ebay, tbh it was bought as a stop gap just so i could get the engine into the car and running as the engine only came with the top part of the exhaust manifold, so it was cheaper (less than £100 delivered!) to buy one of these than to have a downpipe made up to match the vz-r manifold. along with the manifold i also fitted a stock ukdm n15 gti cat and that mated up to the rest of my exhaust system, which was a 2″ catback which was bodged and salvaged from another n16, again just as an interim part to get the car running

toyosports sr manifold

then it was time to turn to the fuelling, the actual fuel lines were a straight forward job as the n15 and ph1 n16 share the same type of fuelling setup, so it was just a case of hooking up the supply and return pipes to the corresponding places on the fuel rail and that was that. when it came to the throttle cable some changes were needed, and in the end what was used was a mixture of an n15 cable with n16 mounting/pedal stop parts. the cable on the top in this pic is the n15 cable, with the n16 mounting parts, this was needed because although the n15 cable mounted up no problem the pedal stop was in completely the wrong place, so the throttle pedal at rest sat far too high, the n15 bracket is on the right and as you see we just cut it to free the cable, then took the parts from the n16 cable and swapped them over to the n15 cable

n15 and n16 throttle cables

and a close up of how the n16 mount part was modified so it could be fitted to the n15 cable

n15 throttle cable with n16 mounting parts

next up was the radiator, i used a ukdm n15 gti radiator as it had the correct hose locations and although it was a direct fit into the lower crossmember mount points the top mounts didn’t line up at all, so in the end modified n15 radiator top mounts were used (these can be seen in the pic at the bottom of this post). the fan wiring just required splicing the correct plugs for the fans onto the existing n16 fan wiring.

ukdm n15 gti radiator

lastly it was the clutch, now the n16 uses a hydraulic clutch, and most all n15’s use a cable clutch, including the n15 vz-r that supplied my engine and gearbox, luckily there were some n15 vz-r’s that came with a hydraulic clutch, namely the limited edition n15 vz-r N1, luckily for me at the time i was doing this swap there was a guy in ireland that had sourced a gearbox from an n1 that he was fitting to his n15 so i managed to get the correct clutch actuator lever for the hydraulic clutch from him as hes was converting it back to cable operation. so it was a simple case of removing the cable operated clutch actuator lever and replacing it with the correct one

hydraulic lever on the left, cable on the right

hydraulic and cable clutch actuator levers

and fitted to the box

new actuator lever fitted

and at the same time i fitted a new clutch, though to be honest the clutch that came with the engine and box had plenty of life in it, testament to the low km’s they had done before ending up in my hands

exedy clutch kit

so that was the engine in, and all hooked up to the car mechanically, new clutch, fluids and filters, all that remained was the wiring, and this pic will give you a small taste of what i was facing lol

engine in and mechanically hooked up

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2 Responses to Engine swap part 2 – sr16ve, sorting out the mechanicals

  1. luz says:

    How long take this swap sr16ve?

    • admin says:

      Hi luz, in actual hours of work the mounting and mechanical parts of the swap took about 10 to 12 hours, this included removing the existing engine. the wiring on the other hand brought some problems as I ended up having to strip the complete engine loom to work out which wires were which. Then of course I had to reassemble and re-wrap it. But with the info I’ve provided in the first two posts and the wiring info I’ll post in the third post I’ve still to write up i’d say you could do the swap in a weekend if you have all the required parts sitting.

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